Lean In Slowly

BUT SURELY.

“You don’t choose your passion, your passion chooses you.”
— Jeff Bezos

Passion requires Temperament
— David M Keirsey

He said to her: “If you’re offered a seat on a rocket ship, you don’t ask what seat. You just get on.”

When companies grow quickly, there are more things to do than there are people to do them. When companies grow more slowly or stop growing, there is less to do and too many people to be doing them. Politics and stagnation set in, and everyone falters. 

When debating her next career move, Sheryl Sandberg made a spreadsheet comparing the roles and responsibilities that would come with each position and company she was considering. Google was on her list (a relatively unknown company in 2001), and ranked lower than all of the other options in categories like security, salary and responsibilities, but when Sandberg presented her dilemma to Eric Schmidt, Google’s CEO at the time, he managed to change her mind with this simple piece of advice:

“[Eric] covered my spreadsheet with his hand and told me not to be an idiot (also a great piece of advice). Then he explained that only one criterion mattered when picking a job—fast growth. When companies grow quickly, there are more things to do than there are people to do them. When companies grow more slowly or stop growing, there is less to do and too many people to be doing them. Politics and stagnation set in, and everyone falters. He told me, “If you’re offered a seat on a rocket ship, you don’t ask what seat. You just get on.”

Sandberg made up her mind that instant and joined Google, which as we all know was one of the fastest flying rocket ships ever created, to date.

“In addition to the external barriers erected by society, women are hindered by barriers that exist within ourselves. We hold ourselves back in ways both big and small, by lacking self-confidence, by not raising our hands, and by pulling back when we should be leaning in. We internalize the negative messages we get throughout our lives— the messages that say it’s wrong to be outspoken, aggressive, more powerful than men. We lower our own expectations of what we can achieve. We continue to do the majority of the housework and child care. We compromise our career goals to make room for partners and children who may not even exist yet. Compared to our male colleagues, fewer of us aspire to senior positions. This is not a list of things other women have done. I have made every mistake on this list. At times, I still do.” — Sandberg, Sheryl. Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead (Kindle Locations 140-148).

 

Sheryl Kara Sandberg, Fieldmarshal Rational(born August 28, 1969) is an American businesswoman, activist, and writer. As of August 2013, she is the chief operating officer of Facebook. In June 2012, she was elected to the board of directors by the existing board members becoming the first woman to serve on Facebook’s board. Before Facebook, Sandberg was Vice President of Global Online Sales and Operations at Google, and was involved in launching Google’s philanthropic arm Google.org. Before Google, Sandberg served as chief of staff for the United States Secretary of the Treasury.

In 2012 she was named in the Time 100, an annual list of the 100 most influential people in the world according to Time magazine. As of January 2014, Sandberg is reported to be worth over US$1 billion, due to her stock holdings in Facebook and other companies. [Wikipedia,revised]

Her sister and brother consider themselves as Sheryl’s first employees when they were all young.  Sheryl was born to lead.  She leaned in slowly, but surely.

 Fieldmarshals are bound to lead others, and from an early age they can be observed taking command of groups. [Please Understand Me II]

“My argument is that getting rid of these internal barriers is critical to gaining power. Others have argued that women can get to the top only when the institutional barriers are gone. This is the ultimate chicken-and-egg situation. The chicken: Women will tear down the external barriers once we achieve leadership roles. We will march into our bosses’ offices and demand what we need, including pregnancy parking. Or better yet, we’ll become bosses and make sure all women have what they need. The egg: We need to eliminate the external barriers to get women into those roles in the first place. Both sides are right. So rather than engage in philosophical arguments over which comes first, let’s agree to wage battles on both fronts. They are equally important. I am encouraging women to address the chicken, but I fully support those who are focusing on the egg.”  — Sandberg, Sheryl. Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead (Kindle Locations 149-155).

Fieldmarshal organizational and coordinating skills tends to be highly developed, which means that they are likely to be good at systematizing, ordering priorities, generalizing, summarizing, marshaling evidence, and at demonstrating their ideas.  [Please Understand Me II]

 

“Some, especially other women in business, have cautioned me about speaking out publicly on these issues. When I have spoken out anyway, several of my comments have upset people of both genders. I know some believe that by focusing on what women can change themselves— pressing them to lean in— it seems like I am letting our institutions off the hook. Or even worse, they accuse me of blaming the victim. Far from blaming the victim, I believe that female leaders are key to the solution. Some critics will also point out that it is much easier for me to lean in, since my financial resources allow me to afford any help I need. My intention is to offer advice that would have been useful to me long before I had heard of Google or Facebook and that will resonate with women in a broad range of circumstances.” — Sandberg, Sheryl. Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead (Kindle Locations 182-185).

Other Fieldmarshal Rationals include:  Malala YousafzaiTan Le, Muriel SiebertJerry BussJohn AdamsIndra NooyiWilliam Pitt, the YoungerEllen Sirleaf and Joyce Banda, and Margaret Thatcher.

6 thoughts on “Lean In Slowly

  1. auguries8 April 27, 2014 / 4:44 pm

    Reblogged this on auguries14 and commented:
    Lean in Slowly-(Please Understand Me Temperament Blog.)

    Like

  2. John July 8, 2015 / 9:55 am

    How is Sheryl Sandberg an ENTJ?

    I honestly thought she’s ESFJ.

    Did you read/hear that interview where, I think, she said Mark Zuckerberg offered her a hug when she cried to him because some rumors got around that’s untrue or something to that effect? Zuckerberg even advised her to “stop thinking what other people are thinking in order to get where you want to be” at one point during their work?

    How do you explain this?

    She seems an ESFJ at the right place at the right time when she noticed something that needed to be told: the “Lean In” controversy. Oh, and she also just happened to like statistics – an ESFJ who likes statistics.

    Like

    • David Keirsey July 10, 2015 / 12:44 pm

      It is possible that she is Provider Guardian, however, I saw her as Preemptive, beginning from childhood, she is a natural leader even with her younger siblings. But even Fieldmarshals need to (and must) learn and make mistakes. Not all Fieldmarshals are cold harden killers and they even cooperate at times! Again, looking at the overall, long term behavior, I concluded Fieldmarshal Rational. She went to Google from a political context, and jumped to Facebook to take a COO (in charge) job, whereas I would argue that her final position at Google was more of a philanthropic (giving job) than her current job.

      Like

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