The King

of Comedy.

Hail Caesar!

He was the King: A Natural Caesar.  Sid Caesar.

And he was a natural Entertainer from the start:

Max and Ida Caesar ran a restaurant, a 24-hour luncheonette. By waiting on tables, their son learned to mimic the patois, rhythm and accents of the diverse clientele, a technique he termed “double-talk,” which he would famously use throughout his career. He first tried his “double-talk” with a group of Italians, his head barely reaching above the table. They enjoyed it so much that they sent him over to a group of Poles to repeat his native-sounding patter in Polish, and so on with Russians, Hungarians, Frenchmen, Spaniards, Lithuanians and Bulgarians.

He was the King.  Hail to King. Long Live the King. The King of early television comedy.

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He Delivered

‘You son of a bitch, you can’t kick it that far!’  — Vince Lombardi

No Vince, you were wrong.  He delivered.

summerall

Both on the field and off the field.

George Allen “Pat” Summerall (May 10, 1930 – April 16, 2013) was an American football player and television sportscaster, having worked at CBS, Fox, and ESPN.

A Hall of Fame sportscaster.

He delivered, for 50 years.

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You can never go home, again

Toto, I’ve got a feeling we’re not in Kansas anymore.

It was a comfortable, almost a Tom Sawyer existence.  It seemed to be a much simpler time. Yes, I was young.

It was the 50s.

Well, actually in this particular case, it was played in the innocent 60’s as if it was the 50’s.

He was like those wise, kind, and forgiving fathers of the 50’s.  The time of Ike, who protected and provided for us, hiding the complexities and real dangers of life from us.  TV fathers and mothers of the 50s and 60s.  Providing and Protecting.

Father Knows Best, My Three Sons, The Donna Reed Show, The Rifleman, Leave it to Beaver, Sky King, and … Continue reading

Angry Young Man

The Voice is unmistakable.

You know the music.

There is a fifth dimension, beyond that which is known to man.

It is a dimension as vast as space and as timeless as infinity. It is the middle ground between light and shadow, between science and superstition. And, it lies between the pit of man’s fears and the summit of his knowledge. This is the dimension of imagination. It is an area which we call the …

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Tough but Fair

That was his answer.

Tim Russert had asked him what he would want to be his epitaph.

He rarely gave answers.

He did ask a lot of tough questions. Very tough.

In fact, he was the first to do it on Television.

1955. “Night Beat” became an instant hit that New Yorkers began referring to as “brow beat.” His relentless questioning of his subjects proved to be a compelling alternative to the polite chit-chat practiced by early television hosts.

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